Archaeology: Overview

Perth and Kinross abounds with remarkable sites of cultural significance and regionally distinct vernacular buildings. Together this rich and diverse historic environment forms an incredible material record of lives shaped by landscape, lived across millennia in the catchment of the River Tay, it’s connected rivers, and the Leven south of the Ochils. These tangible heritage assets reflect and provide reminders of our shared intangible cultural heritage and how this has evolved over time in response to and as a result of societal, environmental and technological change.

Effective management of the historic environment requires informed decision making based on good information and sound advice which the Trust provides through the delivery of the Archaeological Planning Advice service to Perth and Kinross Council as well as many of our other schemes and projects such as the development of a regional archaeological research framework for Perth and Kinross (PKARF).

The archaeological sites, monuments and landscapes of the area also form a significant resource in terms of research, green tourism and in defining a sense of place through connection to the land and its past. Developing and supporting opportunities for people from all ages and backgrounds to engage with and learn about the past is therefore of significant importance to the Trust and for more than a decade we have successfully delivered citizen science archaeology projects and heritage events.  These initiatives have not only promoted and raised awareness of this rare resource for the benefit of both residents and visitors to the area, but also contributed to our understanding of past human activity in Perth and Kinross. Community archaeology projects are in great demand and we continue to explore new projects to engage communities in their ancient past whilst our Archaeological Planning Advice service and PKARF work towards it’s long-term management.

Find out more about archaeology at PKHT…

Archaeological Planning Advice Service

PKARF: Regional Research Framework

Explore our archaeology projects...

A Regional Archaeological Research Framework covering the Perth and Kinross local authority region (PKARF) that complements the Scottish Archaeological Research Framework (ScARF), offering a finer resolution picture that better informs our understanding of past human activity in the area and the priorities for future research.

The King’s Seat Hillfort Archaeology Project took place between 2017-2021 as a partnership between Perth and Kinross Heritage Trust and the Dunkeld and Birnam Historical Society to better understand and inform management of the enigmatic Pictish fort near Dunkeld.

The Glenshee Archaeology Project ran between 2012 and 2017 with the aim of uncovering the fascinating story of prehistoric and early historic life in Glenshee.

The Tay Landscape Partnership (TayLP) was a £2.6 million initiative, led by Perth and Kinross Heritage Trust and Perth and Kinross Countryside Trust to celebrate the cultural and natural heritage of the inner Tay estuary.

An annual outreach programme delivered between 2003 and 2018 to raise awareness, celebrate and showcase the region's outstanding historic environment.

A project to conserve bridges and promote the history of General Wade and the 18th Century military road network in Perth and Kinross.

A project exploring the architecture and use of monumental roundhouses in upland Perthshire through the excavation of an example in Black Spout Wood, Pitlochry,

A major project led by the Trust over 10 years, to excavate, recover, conserve and display a 3,000 year old log-boat from the Tay estuary.

COVID-19 Operations Statement

Trust staff are largely home-working until further notice. Please note contractors/deliveries requiring access to Lower City Mills should arrange with a member of staff. We continue to deliver many of our projects and services, however, some work has been postponed or redesigned. Please ensure all enquiries are directed to staff via email as monitoring of office telephones, and mail, is reduced.

General enquiries can still be made using the Contact Us page.

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